Simon Bourne - Photographer
Simon Bourne - Photographer

Blog - 2017

July 17 - Baya Sardinia, Sardinia, Italy

We spent a week in Sardinia, Italy last July (July 2016!) but with so much other stuff going on, I have only just got around to processing all the images.  I had taken around 400 pictures, which always seemed too much to go through until recently.  Most of the photographs were of the various sunsets and sunrises, where every picture (that is only a few minutes apart from the last one) can capture very different and varying light conditions.  So, you cannot really batch process them all; you have to assess each one carefully.

 

I got about 40 in the end that were 5-star by my system, of which about 25 have been posted for sale on Alamy, as several were quite similar in content.  Of those, about 8 were really nice, most of which are now shown in my Landscapes – Sardinia portfolio.

 

The two shown here are both just before the actual sunset, at about 9pm.  The light towards the sun was only 2-3 stops below a sunny day, at an EV of 12-13.  So, on the first image I used f/13 and ISO 160 to then handhold at 1/60s, which was fine with good VR.  The crepuscular rays shining through the stormy clouds looked great.  It seemed obvious for the composition to be nice and symmetrical.  For the second image, I bumped up the shutter speed to 1/200s to capture this crazy flying boat-plane, which appeared like Icarus heading off in to the sun!  At f/11, this increased the ISO to 400, which is about the limit of where even my D810 can best cope in these low-light conditions (and still produce really good quality at large print sizes).

 

I was using my 24-120mm f/4 lens throughout, which is a good compromise solution when only carrying one lens.  It’s a little soft at the edges occasionally, but it has a good focal length range and great VR.  Both images were at around 100mm focal length, which only gave me a depth of field from about 25m to infinity – this was fine as long as I didn’t include any obvious near foreground.

 

We’ve just spent a July week this year in Brittany – hopefully, that set of pictures will be out shortly, not next year!

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, landscape, seascape, sea, island, Mediterranean, Sardinia, Italy, Nikon, sunset, dusk, sun rays, God's rays, crepuscular rays, storm clouds, bay, coast, rocks, orange sky Baya Sardinia 07, Sardinia 2016
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, landscape, seascape, sea, island, Mediterranean, Sardinia, Italy, Nikon, sunset, dusk, sun rays, Icarus, sea plane, boat plane, bay, coast, rocks, orange sky, ship, boat Baya Sardinia 34, Sardinia 2016

July 17 - Westminster Abbey at Dusk, London

I took some photos of Westminster Abbey at dusk last week.  It was due to be a sunny, but partly cloudy evening, which gave the prospect of some good light around sunset.  I took a first sequence from Tothill Street to capture the main West Door (with the Victoria Tower of the Houses of Parliament in the background).  The light of the setting sun was stunning for about 15 minutes – this first image was taken an hour before sunset.  I also used a 5-stop ND Lee filter to lengthen the exposure time (5s) - to get a blur of red London bus in front of the image.

 

For the second sequence, I moved around on to Victoria Street, as I wanted to get the sweep of lights and buses in to the foreground of the photograph.  The second image below was my last shot of the day, with the daylight virtually gone – it was taken an hour after sunset.  By this time, the exposure time was easily long enough (15s) without using any filters.

 

The images were all taken on my 24-70mm f/2.8 lens, set at about 40mm.  The ISO was set at my native value of 64 and the aperture was f/16-22, which helps with the starburst effect on the streetlight, as well as giving good depth of field and longer exposure times, without too much diffraction.  The white balance would normally vary from about 4,000K to 8,000K over this time (and with the change in filters), but it did seem to stay pretty constant at about 5,500K (i.e. normal daylight), probably due to the streetlight temperature.

 

I used the Transform tab in Lightroom to adjust the building verticals – I’ve tried these before and never found that any of the Auto features work very well, but they seemed to work fine this time!  I also had to do a lot of cloning in Photoshop too, as there was all sorts of clutter in the foreground, especially.

 

Overall, not a bad evening’s work.  In hindsight though, the foregrounds are still a little too busy – I’ll try a slightly calmer perspective at some other time.  You can see more of my Westminster Abbey and other Westminster images in my Cityscapes Portfolio.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, central London, Westminster, Westminster Abbey, flag, summer, landscape, structures, Nikon, Houses of Parliament, Victoria Tower, landmark, building, lights, dusk, red London bus, bu Westminster Abbey 01, London 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, central London, Westminster, Westminster Abbey, flag, summer, landscape, cityscape, structures, Nikon, landmark, building, lights, dusk, red London bus, buses, night, starburst Westminster Abbey 03, London 2017

July 17 - SHOTO Special Event 2017, London

Our Shotokan Karate Association, SHOTO, held a special training event last Friday at our Winchmore Hill Dojo to celebrate 40 years of training by each of our 7th Dans, Sensei Tony Kilcullen and Sensei Roy Banton.

 

They both took the Dan grades and the Kyu grades from the whole SHOTO Association through some special Kumite and Kata routines, under the watchful eye of our Chief Instructor, Hanshi Mick Randall MBE, 9th Dan.

 

Jil (6th Dan) trained too, but I (also a 6th Dan) was unfortunately laid up with a recurring injury to my hip replacement.  So, I had the rare opportunity to take some photographs instead.  More can be seen on the Facebook and Twitter pages of SHOTO and on the SHOTO website (www.shoto.org), but some highlights are shown here.

 

The first shows the best portrait of the day during the kata session, while the second shows the best action shot from the kumite.  Some further images are shown in my Abstracts - Karate portfolio.

 

The lighting was tricky at an EV of only about 8, i.e. around 7 stops lower than a sunny day.  Most of the close-ups were using my 70-200mm f/4 lens that I had open at f/5.6 (to give a little more depth of field).  Shutter speeds were 1/100-1/200s to freeze the action and to get a reasonably crisp image.  All up, this left me with an ISO of about 1600 – this was fine for images up to about A4/A5 size.  Anything larger than A4 would really start to show the low-light noise levels, even with my D810/D7100 sensors and a good dose of noise reduction in Lightroom!

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, Nikon, sport, karate, shotokan, SHOTO, event, Winchmore Hill, dojo, black belt, dan grade, kata, training SHOTO Event 10, London 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, Nikon, sport, karate, shotokan, SHOTO, event, Winchmore Hill, dojo, black belt, dan grade, kumite, training SHOTO Event 35, London 2017

July 17 - Stock Agencies - Stuff Shutterstock

I have just deleted all my images from Shutterstock – they were so unhelpful and made it so difficult; it has literally taken me 4 weeks to get it all done.

 

I was never very happy selling images through them, because as a micro-stock agency, they sell most photographs through a subscription service that offers tiny payments to the photographers.  A more traditional stock agency, like Alamy, offers a proper service with good rewards for the best images.  I’m making considerably more from Alamy than I ever did from Shutterstock.  Shutterstock’s keywording process is also very tedious, whereas Alamy now offers a very slick system.

 

I was generally getting about 80-90% of my photographs accepted on Shutterstock, but their pass-fail criteria were often very strange and incongruous, which did become frustrating.  With Alamy on the other hand, after two early failures at the start, I am now getting 100% of my photographs accepted.

 

The final straw was Shutterstock’s apparent recent changes to their “property release” criteria.  I’m very careful not to include people or logos in my images, or to include private properties.  But Shutterstock (no doubt due to the USA’s more litigious culture) has been failing large swathes of my images recently for “property release” issues.  None of which in my view were correct.  Take these two images.  The first of Buckingham Palace was failed due to “property release” issues.  Firstly, even though it might strictly be a Royal Residence, it is actually in full view of the public – it’s not like I was sneaking around the back gardens, for example!  And secondly, there are already hundreds of royalty-free (boom, boom!) images of Buckingham Palace on Shutterstock anyway, including previous ones of mine!  The second image of the Heron (just further below) was taken at Cliveden, a National Trust property – it was also failed for “property release” issues.  I don’t usually try to sell pictures of the actual National Trust properties, but the gardens and wildlife on their public land is definitely fair game (boom, boom!).

 

So, stuff Shutterstock – I’ve now closed my account entirely.  All my images are now solely available via this website or on Alamy – there’s a link on my Home page to my Alamy portfolio with nearly 500 photographs.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, central London, Westminster, Buckingham Palace, flag, red tulips, gardens, spring, landscape, structures, Nikon, royal, landmark, building, lights, dusk, night, red sky, sunset Buckingham Palace 05, London 2017

June 17 - Cliveden, Buckinghamshire

Just added a new section to my Gardens - Places portfolio to cover some late Spring shots at Cliveden in Buckinghamshire.  Cliveden sits on the banks of the River Thames and has been a famous country home (and location of elite parties) for various owners from the Duke of Buckingham in 1666-1687 to the Astors in 1893-1967.

 

As ever, waiting for some low light and/or stormy skies was the key to capturing the more interesting images.  National Trust properties like this are difficult as you cannot get in to the grounds in the really early morning or late afternoon for the very best lighting conditions – so, you have to wait for the best type of light during a typical day.

 

Other images of the main gardens can be seen in this website portfolio or on my Stock Agency collection at Alamy (see the Home Page for direct access), but the two here are from the lovely Japanese water gardens.

 

The wide shot was taken with my 24-70mm f/2.8 lens on my D810 – f/13 for good depth of field and 1/160s to freeze the little bit of wind movement, both of which resulted in a reasonably low ISO of 200.  If you look closely, you can see a Heron on the far bank of the lake.  The second photograph is a lovely close-up of that same Heron – it took quite a few shots to get a perfectly crisp and clean image with that gorgeous soft, green light as a background.  This was taken with my 200-500mm f/5.6 lens on a D7100 – wide open at f/5.6 and 1/500s to freeze any movement, both of which were possible in that light using a perfect ISO of 100.  At full size, you can see every feather on its head in perfect sharpness – I must get it printed out at about A2 to really show it off!

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, spring, summer, lake, Cliveden, Buckinghamshire, home, The Astors, house, grounds, wildlife, Heron, water gardens, Japanese, pond, waterfall, Nikon Cliveden 19, Buckinghamshire 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, spring, summer, lake, Cliveden, Buckinghamshire, home, The Astors, house, grounds, wildlife, Heron, Nikon Heron 02, Cliveden 2017

June 17 - University Campus, York

Picked up our son Ben from York for the last time – he’s just finished a four-year MSc course in Chemistry.  I doubt he’ll ever go back again – maybe periodically!  I’ve never really had time before to look around the campus properly – so, now was a good opportunity to take some pictures for the last time.

 

It’s a lovely campus, rather spoiled by the 1960s buildings that are distinctly showing their age now.  As ever as a landscape and wildlife photographer, I always carry two cameras with me, as the process of constantly changing lenses to suit different shots, subjects or lighting conditions is too time consuming.  This time, I carried my lovely 24-70mm f/2.8 on a Nikon D810 and the 200-500mm f/5.6 on my D7100.  This latter lens operates as an effective 300-750mm lens on the DX camera, which is superb for the wildlife images that you can nearly always take whilst capturing landscape pictures.

 

The first image shows the central fountain on the main lake framed by a new seating area – the day was stormy but very sunny as well.  The late afternoon sun was still rather bright for my liking, but worked well enough once I incorporated some graduated filters and adjustment brushes in Lightroom!  It was taken at 1/200s, f/10 and ISO 100 on a 50mm focal length.

 

The second picture shows one of the many Greylag Geese on the campus.  You do need the slightly brighter light of the day to get the best wildlife shots, although admittedly animal behaviour can be very different in the daytime as compared to times closer to dawn or dusk.  In these brighter lights though, you can get higher shutter speeds, of 1/800s say, with the lens wide open at f/5.6 whilst keeping the ISO nice and low at 100-400.

 

I’ve added a selection of other wildlife images from York to my Wildlife Countryside portfolio.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, spring, lake, York University, campus, grounds, fountain, pond, seating, decking, Nikon Fountain 02, York University 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, spring, lake, York University, campus, grounds, wildlife, geese, Greylag Goose, Nikon Greylag Goose 05, York 2017

May 17 - Last Days of Spring, London

I caught the last swathe of spring flowers and colours in our front garden a few days ago.  We’ll be opening the front and back gardens for the National Garden Scheme (NGS) Open Gardens next year again – both our gardens are particularly designed by Jil to have some interest all year around, but they definitely look their very best at the end of May – just after the Chelsea Flower Show!

 

There’s a lovely mix of Allium, Peony, Iris and Gladiolus at the moment, against the back drop of Box and grasses.  I waited for the best light from the early evening sunshine – the image below was at about 6pm.  As ever, I used a wide angle lens (28mm) and f/11 to ensure a good depth of field.  There was a little wind movement, but about 1/100s shutter speed worked just fine, and the resulting ISO was about 200.

 

You can see a bigger selection of other garden images in my Gardens Portfolio.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, garden, spring, Nikon, Allium, Iris, Peony, Gladiolus, Box, Grass, Stipa, front garden, garden design, Jilayne Rickards Ringwood Avenue 02, London 2017

May 17 - Chelsea Flower Show, London

Jil (www.jilaynerickards.com) and I went to the annual Chelsea Flower Show last week, as we do every year.

 

RHS Members’ Day is always busy, but the crowds do slim out at the end of the day and that time coincided with a lovely evening sunshine, which beautifully enhanced some of the show gardens.  It was worth waiting for that low light to break through the sky. The Best in Show garden was a rather brutal collection of Maltese stones, which did not appear to be anyone’s favourite, except the judges and the main sponsor!  The first image below shows the popular Chris Beardshaw garden, packed with traditional flowers, while our favourite was the lovely Japanese artisan garden designed by Kazuyuki Ishihara, which is shown in the second image.

 

Also, as I have noted lots of times on previous blogs, it’s quite awkward to get the whole garden in focus, from 1-2m close up all the way to 20m or more away.  Really, the only way is to close the aperture down to f/11 to f/16 and to use a wide angle lens of 24-35mm (on a full-frame camera).  On sunny days, it’s then best to use a 35mm lens at f/16 – this also allows a good ISO of 100 and a fast enough shutter speed (>1/100s) to freeze any wind movement.  As the light can drop by around 3 stops though, there are then limited options.  You need to keep to at least 1/100s to shoot both hand-held and to avoid any wind motion in the plants, but open the ISO up to 400-800, which is just about OK on my Nikon D810 (for reasonably large images).

 

There’s a fuller selection of other images from Chelsea 2017 in my Gardens Portfolio.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, garden, spring, flower show, Chelsea Flower Show, Nikon, Beardshaw Chelsea 10, London 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, garden, spring, flower show, Chelsea Flower Show, Nikon, Ishihara Chelsea 21, London 2017

May 17 - Spring at Hughenden, Buckinghamshire

I’ve put another section to my Gardens – Places portfolio to show some Spring images at Hughenden in Buckinghamshire.  It’s a lovely Victorian manor house and gardens, which was Benjamin Disraeli’s country retreat from 1848 to 1881.  He was a colourful and charismatic man who became Queen Victoria’s favourite Prime Minister.  It was meant to be a fresh Spring day with the sun bursting occasionally through the cloud cover, which promised to deliver some good lighting.  However, the sun never appeared – so, I had to make the most of the slightly stormy clouds, which did require a bit more work in Lightroom, with the graduated filters and adjustment brushes.

 

For most shots, I used my D810 with the 24-70mm f/2.8 set at about 30mm.  Using 1/100s and f/8 to f/11, I could then use ISOs of 100-200, which was fine.  There was a Red Kite flying around for most of the day, which I caught separately on my D7100 with a 70-200mm f/4 lens.  Unfortunately, I didn’t bring my 200-500mm f/5.6 lens with me that day – it would have been much better for the Kite images.  Using the smaller lens, I had to crop the shots down to about 6MP to get a good enough image.  The first shot also shows the Kite flying across the manor house – it’s a fake, I’m afraid, but it could have happened!  Clearly, it would normally be very difficult to see a bird of prey (needing a high 1/800s and therefore with a low depth of field f/4) in the same shot as a landscape-style of image (needing a high depth of field f/11 and a therefore a low 1/100s)!  But it works as a piece of art, of course – the camera always lies, as I have said a few times.

 

You can see other views of Hughenden, either in my portfolio here, or in my stock agency portfolio, which you can access from the Home page.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, spring, Hughenden, home, house, grounds, wildlife, Red Kite, bird of prey, Disraeli, Victoria, victorian, storm clouds, Nikon Hughenden 01 and Red Kite 02, Buckinghamshire 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, spring, Hughenden, home, house, grounds, parterre, Disraeli, Victoria, victorian, storm clouds, Nikon Hughenden 03, Buckinghamshire 2017

April 17 - Buckingham Palace at Dusk Again, London

I took some more photos of Buckingham Palace again at dusk last week – see my blog below for the first session.  It was a better evening for a lovely sunset and I changed my position so that the yellow/orange/red glows of the sky were now behind the Palace.  I didn’t notice the stars at the time, but they certainly showed up on my later images as very visible star trails – the 500 rule about star photographs seems wrong to me as the trails are very visible at the 25-30s that the rule suggests.  I would have thought that the exposure needs to be less than half this figure to avoid any noticeable trails on my D810.  Maybe the rule’s OK for internet shots, but certainly not for prints at any decent size.

 

As before, I started off with a 5-stop ND filter and ended up with no filter.  This first image was about 45 minutes after sunset and the second one another 15 minutes later – both without any filter.

 

The images this time were all taken on my slightly wider 16-35mm f/4 lens, generally set at about 19mm.  These two exposures were both at 30s, ISO 64 and f/14.  The white balance varied from about 4,500K to 7,500K.  For the earlier shots, I did also use the adjustment brush to darken the sky by 0.5-1.0 stops.

 

I also used the Transform tab in Lightroom to best adjust the building verticals – I’ve tried these all before and never found that any of the Auto features offer anything that looks acceptable/realistic.  I did make some better adjustments with the Guided feature this time – not using it to its full extent, but just using it partly to balance the verticals both on the Palace itself as well as on the structures towards the edges of the frame.

 

So, adding in the cloning of Photoshop too, the images were all extensively manipulated!

 

You can see more of my Buckingham Palace and Westminster images in my Cityscapes Portfolio.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, central London, Westminster, Buckingham Palace, flag, red tulips, gardens, spring, landscape, structures, Nikon, royal, landmark, building, lights, dusk, night, red sky, sunset Buckingham Palace 05, London 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, central London, Westminster, Buckingham Palace, flag, red tulips, gardens, spring, landscape, structures, Nikon, royal, landmark, building, lights, dusk, night, stars Buckingham Palace 06, London 2017

April 17 - Leucojum and Spring Wildlife, London

I’ve blogged recently about the differences between the macro/studio shot for garden flowers and the landscape type of shot.  There is, of course, also the option to take the studio techniques, with flash, outdoors.  I was using this method last week with the Leucojum (or snowflakes) that are currently in full bloom.

 

I was getting quite close to the flowers, although not really close enough for it to be proper macro-photography – I was just using my standard 24-70mm f/2.8 zoom.  This produced magnifications that were fine, although I would need to crop the images quite tightly to then fill the frame with the key components, getting down to ~12MP, which gives 6MB JPEGs.  These can easily be printed at A3 still with very high quality (>250ppi).

 

As I was needing f/11-16 to get enough depth of field (about 100mm) and at least 1/125s to avoid camera shake or subject movement, the ISO would have become 400-800 in these slightly shady areas.  So, I used a bit of infill flash to bring the ISO back to 100-200, without killing off too much of the ambient light – I always work in manual mode, where it’s easy to play around with the settings to get the best result on the screen/histogram.  I used a separate speedlight on a tripod to the side and set its power to ¼ -½.  This flash was controlled from my Nikon D810 acting as a commander unit.  I always use back-button focussing too – this gives you the option to manual focus, single focus or continuous focus with just one button.

 

Finally and most importantly, I wanted a more interesting shot than just a straight flower portrait – generally, you need some good light or an unusual event to make the photo work well, ideally both!  So, I added a spray of water, looked for the sparkle or refraction in the drops and then waited for some suitable wildlife – the ladybird helped with the first image, while the spider added some interest to the second shot.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, spring, snowflake, Leucojum, Ladybird, wildlife, water drops, light, white flower, sparkle, Nikon Leucojum 04, London 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, spring, snowflake, Leucojum, spider, web, wildlife, water drops, light, white flower, sparkle, Nikon Leucojum 06a, London 2017

April 17 - Buckingham Palace at Dusk, London

I took some images of Buckingham Palace at dusk last week - I arrived about an hour before sunset and took a sequence of long exposures all the way through to about an hour after sunset.  It was meant to be a reasonably clear evening, which should have given an interesting sunset behind the Palace, but it turned out to be considerably more cloudy than I had hoped!  All the RAW files looked, as usual, to be a little flat on the screen, but once I had processed them all, the clouds and sky colours did still look pretty good in the end.  It’s incredible how quickly the sky changes over that time around sunset – you do really need to be taking pictures every few minutes to make it possible to select the ones that are the most evocative.

 

I was really trying to capture the moving cars in front of the Palace, to add a bit more of an event to the images, by using a 5-stop ND filter to bump up the exposure time.  But the better shots certainly came once it had got darker and the lines of the car lights were then much more pronounced – by this time, I wasn’t using any filter.  This first image was about 15 minutes after sunset and the second one another 30 minutes later.

 

The images were all taken on my 24-70mm f/2.8 lens, generally set at about 26mm.  The two exposures varied from 10s to 30s – both at ISO 64 and f/11.  In Lightroom, I had to shift the white balance around as the light disappeared - from about 6,000K initially, up to about 10,000K and then back down to about 4,000K.  For the earlier shots, I did also use the adjustment brush to darken the sky by 0.5-1.0 stops – I hadn’t used an ND grad on the camera, as the dividing line between the light and dark wasn’t at all straight.  I also darkened the highlights and lightened the shadows to pull out the fabulous dynamic range of my D810.

 

I don’t use Photoshop that much, except for the occasional need to clone out some stray features of a picture.  On these images though, the scene was covered not only by rogue tourists, but also by unsightly traffic cones and newly erected security barriers.  The long exposure generally got rid of most of the people, but I did need to spend a long time removing all the clutter of inelegant street furniture!  This certainly gives a much cleaner and crisper picture – the camera always lies, as they say!

 

You can see a bigger collection of other Westminster images in my Cityscapes Portfolio.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, central London, Westminster, Buckingham Palace, flag, red tulips, gardens, spring, landscape, structures, Nikon, royal, landmark, building, lights, dusk, night, storm clouds Buckingham Palace 01, London 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, central London, Westminster, Buckingham Palace, flag, red tulips, gardens, spring, landscape, structures, Nikon, royal, landmark, building, lights, dusk, night, storm clouds Buckingham Palace 02, London 2017

March 17 - Spring at Ightham Mote, Kent

I have now added another section to my Gardens – Places portfolio to show some Spring images at Ightham Mote in Kent (pronounced Item).  It’s a wonderful moated house, which is often described as the most complete small medieval manor house in the country, dating back to about 1320, although it has been modified extensively over the centuries, especially during the Jacobean era of 1550-1625.

 

It was a lovely Spring day with the sun still quite low in the sky, which always makes for better pictures.

 

The first shot here shows the fabulous moat that surrounds the house – I stood on the main wall to get this image, using my 16-35mm f/4 lens on the D810.  I wanted the widest view without losing too much definition at the widest angle – so, used an 18mm focal length.  I also wanted the whole view in focus, from about 0.5m to infinity, which I could get with both this focal length and f/14.  It was then bright enough to also use 1/100s and ISO 100.

 

For the second shot, I had switched back to my 24-70mm f/2.8 lens.  To get the daffodils in good view in the foreground, I needed about 1.5m to infinity in focus, which I could get at 30mm and f/11.

 

You can see lots of other views of Ightham Mote, either in my portfolio here, or in my Alamy or Shutterstock portfolios, which you can access from my Home page.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, spring, lake, moat, Ightham Mote, home, house, grounds, medieval, Jacobean, Aubretia, Nikon Ightham Mote 13, Kent 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, spring, steps, Ightham Mote, home, house, grounds, medieval, Jacobean, Daffodils, Heuchera, Nikon Ightham Mote 09, Kent 2017

March 17 - Early Spring at Chartwell, Kent

Just added a new section to my Gardens - Places portfolio to cover some early Spring shots at Chartwell in Kent.  Chartwell was Winston Churchill’s country home, where he did much painting, landscaping and garden creating.  Early Spring just has some hints of colour whilst the main structure of the garden and grounds are still visible.

 

As ever, waiting for some low light and/or stormy skies was the key to capturing the more interesting images.  National Trust properties like this are difficult as you cannot get in to the grounds in the really early morning or late afternoon for the very best lighting conditions – so, you have to wait for the best type of light during a typical day.

 

I’ve started to always carry two cameras with me now, as the process of constantly changing lenses to suit different shots, subjects or lighting conditions has often meant that I’ve not had the right lens on at the right time!  This time, I carried my lovely 24-70mm f/2.8 on a Nikon D810 and the 70-200mm f/4 on my D7100.  This latter lens operates as an effective 105-300mm lens on the DX camera, which is useful for the wildlife images that you can often take whilst capturing landscape/garden pictures.

 

Otherwise, there wasn’t too much to consider technically.  I used about f/11, ISO 100-200 and around 1/100s on the D810 for the wider shots, and f/4, ISO 100-200 and about 1/500s on the D7100 for the wildlife shots.

 

I’ve posted quite a lot of Westminster pictures on Twitter recently, including ones with the Churchill statue overlooking the Houses of Parliament – so, it was nice to have the utter contrast of the peaceful countryside setting where he often came to get away from the restless pace of political life.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, winter, spring, lake, Chartwell, Winston Churchill, home, house, grounds, red flowers, Cornus, Nikon Chartwell 07, Kent 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, winter, spring, lake, Chartwell, Winston Churchill, home, house, grounds, swan, black swans, cygnus, wildlife, Nikon Swan 03, Chartwell 2017

March 17 - Daffodils in Spring, London

There are definitely two distinct ways to capture flowers – the wonderful daffodils, showing us that Spring is here, are a perfect example.  You can go for the close-up of a single stem/flower like macro-photography or you can capture a whole swathe, which is more like landscape photography.  Either way, you end up with tricky issues regarding the focus and depth of field.

 

I’ve covered the close-up shots quite a lot recently – have a look at my blogs below about the snowdrops.  The same principles apply to this first image of a single, if somewhat garish, daffodil – 50mm normal lens placed about 0.5m away, ISO 64 for best IQ, f/16 to get about 100mm depth of field, 1/320s shutter speed – this is not relevant as the flash provides all the light, studio flash lighting as for a portrait, and waterdrops added to the flower for additional interest and effects.

 

For the swathe of daffodils shot, I went to St James’s Park in central London.  This is like capturing a garden bed, where you need about 2-15m in focus.  From my previous garden blogs, you will know that this is quite difficult to control with only the aperture – essentially, you need to use a wider angle lens to get a better depth of field.  To get 2-15m in focus at f/11, say (which is a good working aperture for reasonable days), then you will need a focal length no longer than about 35mm.  This can often be a wider angle than the shot might need, and you will have to crop the image to suit.

 

So, on this day last week, starting from the sunny sixteen rule, i.e. f/16, 1/100s and ISO 100, I increased the shutter speed to 1/200s as it was quite windy.  This pushed up the ISO to 200 for that sunny day.  It was not quite full sun though and so I decided the best compromise was to increase the aperture to f/11.

 

With the aperture fixed at f/11, I then had to decide what focal length and focus distance to use in order to get everything in focus.  To get 2-15m in focus, I would need a 35-40mm lens and to focus on 3-4m away.  And, to get 2m to infinity in focus, I would need a 35mm lens and to focus on 4-5m away, as the hyperfocal distance is about 4m.  This is all fine, but the wide angle shot was too wide for my composition and would need to be cropped by a factor of two, or so – this would take my 36MP image down to only 9MP, which is a little too small for a wide landscape shot that might get printed at a large size, i.e. anything larger than A3.

 

I therefore went for a tighter composition with a 70mm lens – but I knew that at f/11 the hyperfocal distance was about 15m.  I would need to focus at 15-20m and then only get about 8m to infinity in focus – this worked fine with this second image as there were no flowers in that 8m of foreground.  I know that lots of people take pictures with foregrounds out of focus, but most images of this nature simply will not be accepted by stock agencies unless the whole frame is in focus.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, winter, spring, daffodil, water drops, light, sparkle, Nikon Daffodil 01, London 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, winter, spring, daffodils, yellow flowers, St James's Park, lake, Westminster, Big Ben, Nikon St James's Park 02, London 2017

March 17 - Waterdrops - Macro Lens or Not, London

With my last blogs about Snowdrops and Waterdrops, you may wonder why I hadn’t used a macro lens.  A macro lens certainly gets you very close to the object, i.e. within a 200-300mm, which puts the object almost touching the lens, but its strict definition is that the object is the same size on the sensor (a 1:1 ratio) at the closest focus distance.  For DX or FX sensors, this means that the object should be less than about 25mm in size.  This is the size of insects and very small flowers, but normal flowers and waterdrops with their ripples are much larger than 25mm – so, a normal lens is fine.

 

The main issue with macro-photography is the very limited depth of field (DoF), which may be 10mm or less at this 1:1 ratio, even at f/16.  As noted in the last two blogs, my DoF for the snowdrops and waterdrops was 75-100mm at f/11-16 with my 50mm prime lens focussed at about 0.5m.  This was a good working DoF that captured enough of the image in focus, although it would be better to have been twice as close to avoid cropping so much.

 

I could therefore have used a 100mm lens but its closest focus distance is 1m – at that distance, the image is the same size as a 50mm at 0.5m anyway.  Crucially too, the DoF is only dependent on magnification and aperture.  Magnification is indeed based on focal length and focus distance, but at the same magnification, you get the same DoF.  So, a 50mm lens at 0.5m gives 100mm DoF at f/16, and a 100mm lens at 1.0m gives 100mm too.  As soon as you get closer by this factor of two, i.e. a 50mm at 0.25m or a 100mm at 0.5m (both of which would need to be macro lenses), the DoF drops to 25mm, which does not then capture the scene, without focus-stacking and all that!

 

It’s therefore better to take the images on a normal 50mm lens and crop them – the 36MP image from my D810 then gets cropped to about 9MP to make it fill the frame, i.e. by zooming in by this same factor of two.  This solution maintains the 100mm DoF and produces an image that can still be printed easily at A4 size at really high quality (300ppi).  Whereas a landscape photo might need the full 36MP to be printed at A1/A0, this sort of image would generally not be used above an A4 size, which makes the cropping fine.

 

You can now see some other versions of these waterdrop images below and yet more in my Abstract portfolio.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, abstract, water drops, droplets, high-speed, flash, speedlight, Nikon, macro Waterdrop 10, London 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, abstract, water drops, droplets, high-speed, flash, speedlight, Nikon, macro, milk Waterdrop 11, London 2017

February 17 - How to Catch Waterdrops, London

Continuing my studio and flash theme, I’ve been looking at how to capture waterdrops using high-speed flash synchronisation.  It took a lot of trial and error, especially with the lighting, to eventually get some decent images.  Like wildlife photography, it’s difficult to capture the moment and just as difficult to get everything sharply in focus!

 

For wildlife, you need wide apertures (f/5.6 on a telephoto) and high shutter speeds (<1/1000s), which often then gives high ISOs of 400-1600.  With studio flash though, the shutter speed is irrelevant as it’s the very short flash duration of a speedlight that generates the speed.  So, like photographing snowdrops (see my last blog), you can set the aperture to f11-16 to get enough depth of field, the ISO to 100-200 for best image quality and the shutter to 1/320s, which kills the ambient light and is the fastest flash sync speed.  Both these typical wildlife and studio set-ups produce depth of fields of less than 100mm – hence the difficulty with focus.

 

The real key is to set the speedlights on their lowest power, which for my Nikon SB-700s is 1/128 – at this power the flash duration is 1/40,000s, i.e. way faster than any shutter.  Once you have this very low power though, the flash speedlights need to be very close to the waterdrop location (inverse square law and all that!).  Given the depth of field and speed requirements, the only ways left to control the light are the ISO and the distance.  With two speedlights placed at about 150mm away, the set-up worked OK with an ISO of 100-200.  The flashes should be placed to light the backdrop or the background - both my flashes were then controlled from my Nikon D810 acting as a commander unit.  I had to play around with the speedlight zoom and illumination pattern settings for a while to get a nice even light.

 

From the first session, I picked out this one below as the best but you will be able see some other versions shortly in my Abstract portfolio.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, waterdrop, flash, speedlight, water drops, light, sparkle, high-speed, capture, droplet, Nikon Waterdrop 02, London 2017

February 17 - Winter Snowdrops, London

The snowdrops are all in flower again – it’s mild and windy at the moment, but they can cope with any of February’s harshest frosts.  Being quite small flowers, they are always difficult to photograph – you either need a large swathe of them or you need to be very close to pick out a single stem.  Capturing them outside can be tricky too – the very limited depth of field being the main problem.  You need f/11-16 to get enough in focus and it needs to be nice and calm too, as the wind can be a real issue with movement.  Even on a bright day, it only just about works.  Once it’s dull, you have to up the ISO or slow the shutter speed, neither of which is great.

 

So, I decided to opt for the studio shot instead.  Being a landscape and wildlife photographer, I haven’t really used much studio or flash work before – so, it was a good time to experiment!

 

Using my 50mm prime lens which can focus down to about 450mm, I needed at least f/11 to get enough depth of field – you get about 75mm at f/11, but only 50mm at f/8 and a tiny 25mm at f/4.  So, I used f/11-16.  I set the ISO to its lowest level of 64 for the highest quality.  With the shutter set at the sync speed of 1/320, I knew that the ambient light would be killed off and that I’d be totally reliant on the flash lighting.  The only controls left to manage the lighting are thus the flash power and distance.

 

I used my two Nikon SB-700 speedlights and set the scene up as you would a studio portrait, with the main lighting in the front at 450 to the camera.  I put a diffuser on that flash to soften its effect and had the power on about ½.  I was then trying to get some other lighting effects from the second flash.  I could either put it at an angle behind the flower (covered in water drops) to get some sparkling in the water drops – as you can see in the first image.  Ideally though, I was trying to get some rainbow effects in the water drops by putting the second flash at a 450 angle in front of the flower – this wasn’t quite as successful as I had hoped, but you can see some rainbow effects in the second image.  Strictly, a spherical water drop will always subtend an angle of 420 between the light source and the observer.  I used a harder light on this second flash and set its power to ¼ -½.  Both flashes were then controlled from my Nikon D810 acting as a commander unit.

 

I was pleased with them all in the end and you can see some other versions of these studio images in my Gardens-Seasons portfolio.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, winter, snowdrop, water drops, light, sparkle, Nikon Snowdrop 06, London 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, gardens, winter, snowdrop, water drops, light, sparkle, Nikon Snowdrop 07, London 2017

February 17 - Stock Agency Submissions

It’s been a year since I first started uploaded pictures to a couple of Stock Agencies.  At the start, I was trying to add quite a number of older photographs and my acceptance rate for the first few hundred was about 50% - most of those were failing on either exposure (or white balance), noise or focus.

 

  1. Exposure is clearly an issue – agencies tend to like medium contrast images.  Either high contrast or low contrast photos seem to get rejected much more easily.  Anyway, most of my lighting issues were probably related to white balance.  They seem to prefer the use of the “correct” white balance, frowning upon any artistic uses to make the image either warmer or cooler.  I’ve sorted all these areas out now by always using an accurate white balance and making Levels adjustments with the Blacks/Whites sliders to maximise the tonal range.  I can get virtually 100% accepted now even with tricky contre-jour shots.
  2. Noise was a real issue with my older DX sensors, used at above ISO 200-400 and with large patches of colour/sky in poor light.  Since moving most of my work to a full-frame/FX sensor, which is mainly used at ISO 64-200, often with a sturdy tripod, I can also get almost 100% accepted now.  You do still have to be careful at higher ISOs not to use too much use noise reduction in Lightroom, as this is also frowned upon!
  3. Focus has to be very precise as well and agencies don’t seem to like any artistic uses of depth of field.  Either the main content of the shot should be in focus (and the rest not), or the whole of the image should be in focus – anything in between will get rejected.  As a result, I have been much more careful about depth of field in the last few years – I generally work it all out beforehand on an App or on my own spreadsheet.  So I now know for every shot, the near and far focus points that match my focal length, aperture and focus distance.  It’s often very critical as it can then determine the settings for most shots.

All up nowadays, I can get close to all my images being accepted.  I still need to add lots more though, as you need to be selling thousands of images to make it worthwhile, not just hundreds.  The images, of course, also have to be suitable for commercial use, i.e. taken from public land and of public places!  Private photos of people or private buildings, or anything from private land, cannot be used.  As a result you do need to remove any recognisable people from all the images - any trademarks or logos must be removed too.

 

Basically, I take pictures of what I like, mainly landscapes and wildlife, and then try to sell those images.  Strangely though, my best seller so far is this flag from the Canadian Rockies – not my greatest shot as the lighting is nothing special, but this one of Big Ben, which really is a real favourite of mine, is my second best seller.

 

Have a look at my Portfolio below for a bigger selection of other images.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, abstract, flags, Rockies, symbols, Canadian, Nikon, Banff, Canada Banff 02, Canada 2013
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, landscape, structures, Westminster Bridge, Big Ben, River Thames, sunset, dusk, boat, long exposure, Nikon Westminster Bridge 06, London 2016

February 17 - Fistral Beach Sunset Surfers, Cornwall

To finish the blogs about Fistral Beach, here are a couple of close-ups of the evening surfers.  There were a number of windy days that ended with lovely orange sunsets – either way, the surfers continued surfing well in to it being dark, for easily an hour after sunset.  I did capture several moments when the orange and yellow sunset was glistening on the waters as they all waited for the next waves, or then caught a wave.

 

I used the fabulous 200-500mm f/5.6 Nikon lens on my D7100, with high shutter speeds of 1/500-1/1000 to capture any motion on the water and the lens wide open at f/5.6.  I also used the ISO-Auto to help get the right exposure in rapidly changing light conditions – the ISO varying from 100-640 as the light changed.

 

The detail produced with this lens wide open at f/5.6, and at all focal lengths, is really exceptional, especially at low ISOs.  You do have to be a little careful with the focus point though, as the depth of field is quite small, typically +/- 5m when focussing 50-100m away.  Even though the VR on the lens is fantastic, it’s also best to switch it off when using shutter speeds that do not need it to be on!

 

I tend to use my Nikon D7100 (a DX camera with a cropped sensor) for these sporty or wildlife photographs and my Nikon D810 (an FX camera with a full-frame sensor) for landscape photos.  I know that there’s a debate about whether DX or FX bodies are best for wildlife photography.  In essence, you can argue that the DX body gives you a longer reach, i.e. my 200-500mm lens gives the same image size as a 300-750mm lens on an FX camera, and that the DX sensor has a greater pixel density with more pixels/mm (~250) compared to the FX sensor on my D810 (at ~200 pixels/mm).  Alternatively, it’s a more valid argument to note that the FX sensor has more and larger photosites/pixels, giving better overall quality, better ISO performance, less noise and a better dynamic range.

 

Either way, it suits me to have longer lenses (200-500mm f/5.6) on my D7100 and shorter lenses (16-35mm f/4, 24-70mm f/2.8 and 70-200mm f/4) on my D810.

 

You can see more of these surfing images in my Abstract Portfolio.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, landscape, Cornwall, seascape, sea, surf, surfers, Nikon, Fistral, waves, tide, sunset, dusk Fistral Beach 22, Cornwall 2016
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, landscape, Cornwall, seascape, sea, surf, surfers, Nikon, Fistral, waves, tide, sunset, dusk Fistral Beach 24, Cornwall 2016

February 17 - Fistral Beach Sunsets, Cornwall

As noted in my last blog, I captured a number of great sunset shots in Newquay last October too.

 

Waiting for the right moments is essentially the key – the sun to be low enough in the sky, the clouds to be in a good place to give dramatic light effects or great swathes of stormy darkness, the reflections on the sea to be strong and finally, something to be happening in the frame – surfers surfing or people walking in the rock pools, or something else of interest…..

 

Getting the exposure right is always tricky too – the light can be similar to a sunny day if you expose for the main highlights, whereas it can be easily 5 stops less if you expose for the main shadows.  It all depends what effect you want in the final picture.  Luckily with the fabulous sensor on my Nikon D810, I know that I can expose for whatever I want and the camera will capture pretty much all the detail and colour with almost no noise (at ISO 64 especially).  Often the real peaks of the highlights will be at least 5 stops brighter than the mid-range and the real depths of the shadows at least 5 stops darker, giving a dynamic range of 10 stops, or more – similar to the 10 Zones that Ansel Adams used (though not quite, as his system referred to printing).  However, whereas that sort of range is more than the 5-8 stops that a modern phone or compact camera can record, it is not more than the 14 stops that my full-frame FX sensor can pick up.

 

So, you can spot meter for the main highlights and get a view, spot meter for the main shadows similarly or go somewhere in between.  Most of my shots are neither low-key nor high-key, as the stock agencies where I sell most of them tend to prefer normal mid-range lighting images.  Therefore, I work on the mid-range but expose to the right (ETTR) with the histogram as best I can, in order to capture the highest quality of data in the images – but this is perhaps only 1 stop brighter so as to avoid blowing out too many of the highlights.  As I also work in RAW, there is always more to find in the images than the histogram might suggest (as it’s based on a simple JPG).  I then work in Lightroom by dodging and burning to produce as natural-looking a picture as I can.

 

You can see some of the other sunset images from Cornwall in my Landscapes Portfolio.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, landscape, Cornwall, seascape, sea, surf, beach, Nikon, Fistral, waves, tide, sunset, dusk Fistral Beach 41, Cornwall 2016
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, landscape, Cornwall, seascape, sea, surf, beach, Nikon, Fistral, waves, tide, sunset, dusk Fistral Beach 18, Cornwall 2016

January 17 - Fistral Beach, Newquay, Cornwall

I took lots of photographs last autumn around Fistral Beach in Newquay – Cornwall is fabulous in October time – wild and stormy but not too cold and not as packed as during the summer.

 

This first batch of daytime shots was taken in the late afternoon sun, which is pleasantly low in the sky to give good lighting and depth to the scenes.  All were taken with my 24-70mm f/2.8 lens, which is fabulous although it can be a little soft if used at its extremes, especially at 24mm.  Otherwise, focussing is not difficult as with that range of focal lengths the hyperfocal distance at f/11 is 3-10m – so, as long as you focus on something more than that distance (say, 20m away), everything is in focus from about 5m to infinity, which suited my images just fine.  Best to focus some good distance beyond the hyperfocal, otherwise you lose the far distance point very quickly.  I kept the shutter speed generally up above about 1/400s to capture the spray in the surf – but this did occasionally push the ISO up to 200-400.

 

I was then generally pushing the histogram as far right as possible (ETTR - but only with the lowest ISO of 64) – see my last blog about Ansel Adams.  In Lightroom, I can then solve these high contrast images by burning/darkening the highlights (with overall adjustments, by using the graduated filter or adjustment brush/mask) and dodging/lightening the shadows.  The dynamic range of my D810 is so high (about 14EV ?) that you can make all these adjustments with no obvious loss of quality, even at 100%.  I still use Lee Filters graduated filters when possible to control the dynamic range of the scene, but many times I can get exactly the same result just with Lightroom.  No point using filters to block out the light when a) the sensor can cope with the range and b) you are happy to use ETTR anyway !

 

You can see some of the other images from Cornwall in my Landscapes Portfolio, and I’ll be posting some sunset shots shortly.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, landscape, Cornwall, seascape, sea, surf, beach, Nikon, Fistral, waves, tide Fistral Beach 07, Cornwall 2016
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, landscape, Cornwall, seascape, sea, surf, beach, Nikon, Fistral, waves, tide Fistral Beach 36, Cornwall 2016

January 17 - Hyde Park Area, London

I took a set of photographs around the Hyde Park area this week – it was in the middle of the day, but the sun was still quite low in the sky and it was very clear (and cold), giving some very nice lighting conditions.  I also used my new fast prime lens throughout – a lovely but simple 50mm f/1.4.  Almost everything was shot at ISO 100 at about f/11 and 1/125s – the detail and clarity in the images from my Nikon D810 at 100% is stunning across the whole frame, which is just what I wanted and expected !  I look forward to using this lens more – for both low-light conditions and great bokeh.

 

Having got an Ansel Adams book of photographs for Xmas, I was also experimenting with some techniques for best quality exposure – basically, exposing for the highlights and developing the shadows (which is the opposite of what Adams used to do for black and white film, but is correct for the digital age) and then also pushing the exposure as far right as possible (ETTR), without blowing out the highlights.  I’ll talk about these ideas in a bit more detail in a future blog about Cornish seascapes.

 

Anyway, I got pictures of the majestic swans on the Serpentine, of the wonderfully golden Albert Memorial, the Royal Albert Hall and then the Wellington Arch down by Hyde Park Corner.  I remember Professor Sir Alan Harris telling us in the first year of my MSc course at Imperial College (just behind the Royal Albert Hall) back in about 1982 that the Albert Memorial and the Royal Albert Hall both cost about the same to build !  We see the Royal Albert Hall as a very grand structure nowadays, but in reality it was quite a utilitarian building at the time – built for about £200k in 1871.  In contrast, the Albert Memorial is extraordinarily ornate – built for about £120k in 1875.  A fascinating balance in the age-old debate about form and function, i.e. Vitruvius’s venustas and utilitas from about 50BC – have a quick look at my paper from The Structural Engineer in the Bridge Consultant section of this website, which highlights this issue in relation to landmark bridge design.

 

You can then see some of the other images from this day in Hyde Park in my Cityscapes Portfolio.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, central London, Albert Memorial, Hyde Park, Prince Regent, Consort, Queen Victoria, Victorian, golden, Nikon Albert Memorial 02, London 2017
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, central London, Royal Albert Hall, Hyde Park, Prince Regent, Consort, Queen Victoria, Victorian, red brick, stone, South Kensington, Nikon Royal Albert Hall 03, London 2017

January 17 - Tower Bridge at Dusk, London

I took some further images of Tower Bridge at dusk early last October, but have only just finished processing them !  I arrived about an hour before sunset and took a sequence of long exposures all the way through to about an hour after sunset.  I didn’t notice the stars in the later shots at the time, but they definitely showed up on my sensor.

 

I was really trying to capture the moving river boats on the water, to add a bit more of an event to the images – a great picture often has some unusual event caught in dramatic lighting conditions.  The images were all taken on my 16-35mm f/4 wide-angle lens, generally set at about 30mm.  The best exposure for me was for about 20 seconds.  At ISO 64 and f/16, this meant that at the beginning of the shoot, I needed about 5 stops of my ND filters, whereas by the time it was dark, I didn’t need any filter.  For the shots with the moon, I reduced the exposure to about 5 seconds to avoid the movement in the moon/stars that you can easily see at 20 seconds – I opened up to f/11 and bumped up the ISO a touch to 160 to suit.  In hindsight, I should have opened up the aperture a touch more to f/8, as the image is a little noisy at full size in the areas of dark sky, even with the fabulous full-frame sensor and a suitable amount of noise reduction in Lightroom.  I would have still got everything in focus from about 2m to infinity, as long as I focussed on something about 5-10m away.

 

The sequence of three is interesting - going from a sunburst shot taken about 30 minutes before sunset, to the dramatic moving red lights of the river boat that was taken about 30 minutes after sunset, to the final photograph taken a full hour after sunset that combines the drama of the lights on the bridge with the boat lights and the moon/stars.

 

Virtually all I had to do in Lightroom was to shift the white balance from about 5,000K for the first few images gradually up to about 8,000K and then back down to about 4,000K for the last few.  I also darkened the highlights and lightened the shadows to pull out the massive dynamic range of my Nikon D810.

 

You can see a bigger collection of other Tower Bridge images in my Cityscapes Portfolio.

Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, central London, River Thames, Tower Bridge, The Shard, sunset, dusk, night, lights, river boat, Nikon, City Hall, sunburst Tower Bridge 29, London 2016
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, central London, River Thames, Tower Bridge, The Shard, sunset, dusk, night, lights, river boat, Nikon, City Hall, plane, vapour trail, long exposure Tower Bridge 34, London 2016
Simon Bourne, photography, photographer, north London, portfolio, image, central London, River Thames, Tower Bridge, The Shard, sunset, dusk, night, lights, river boat, Nikon, City Hall, moon, stars, long exposure Tower Bridge 38, London 2016
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